The Architecture of Berlin

There were many things about Germany that surprised me. The friendliness of the people. How the countryside looked just like the southeastern part of Pennsylvania, where I’m from. The way in which every city seemed a place unto itself, each so different from all the others we visited.

Berlin was the most strikingly different city. I’ve never been anywhere like it, not in Germany or anywhere else. My boyfriend called is a modern-day Paris, and I think he’s right. The city has great and terrible histories – the marks are everywhere. Buildings are riddled with bullet holes. Triumphant gates and columns. Small golden squares sit deep in the sidewalk, remembering those who were taken from their homes. A modern building hugs and supports a destroyed church. In fact, modern buildings seem to hug and support the whole city. There are so few historic buildings left, especially downtown. The city seems to be endlessly being restored and rebuilt, and it gleams with the bright reflection of glass and color. Bouyant structures are everywhere.


The beautiful, hyper-modern train station.
The beautiful, hyper-modern train station.

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A bridge connects two government buildings, high above the street.
A bridge connects two government buildings, high above the street.


Glass and sky for miles downtown.
Glass and sky for miles downtown.


One of the gorgeous government buildings along the river Spree.
One of the gorgeous government buildings along the river Spree.


One of a string of courtyards in East Berlin surrounded by beautiful buildings with tile facades.
One of a string of courtyards in East Berlin surrounded by beautiful buildings with tile facades.


Taking a boat tour on the river Spree was one of the highlights of our trip, and was a fantastic way to see the city.
Taking a boat tour on the river Spree was one of the highlights of our trip, and was a fantastic way to see the city.


Another government building, right near the Reichstag.
Another government building, right near the Reichstag.


More glass, more sky, near Tiergarten.
More glass, more sky, near Tiergarten.

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The Architecture of Berlin

Women in Photography Night at the Photographic Resource Center

I have been volunteering with the Photographic Resource Center (PRC) at Boston University since last October, and have greatly enjoyed the various events and opportunities they offer. The organization truly is one of the best resources for photographers in New England. I was very excited to have the opportunity to share my work at one of their peer-review nights last Thursday. Lisa Kessler, a professor at Endicott College, hosted the night in which I, Leslie Jardine, Barbara Trachtenberg, Paris Visone, and Ryan McMahon shared our work. The conversation was lively, and the work shared showed a wide breadth of photographic interests and the stellar quality of work happening in the Boston area.

Click the image below to see more photos from the event!

presenting my work
presenting my work! (c) Marisol Marquez
Women in Photography Night at the Photographic Resource Center

Another Day at the . . . Studio

home studio

So sorry for the long (very long) break between posts! But good news: I have started a new photo project! The tentative title for the series is “Workplace,” and will be portraits of my current and former coworkers’ shoes. There’s much work to be done yet, but I’m so pleased with how the shoots have been going so far that I had to share. So here are two of my current favorites as a teaser:

black and teal hightop shoe

black and pink cheetah print high heel

Once the series is complete, I’ll post it on my website and post about it here as well. Can’t wait to show you the finished series!

Another Day at the . . . Studio

Photograping at The Photographic Resource Center

One of my side projects as of late has been photographing and volunteering at events for the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University. If you’re unfamiliar with the organization, I highly recommend browsing their website as they offer a fantastic range of photography-related events and resources. Within the last month I photographed an informal critique on street photography, a lecture on collecting photography, and a lecture by photographer Catherine Wagner.

Click on the photos below for many more photos from each event, and definitely check out their website and list of events!

 

Street Night – September 28, 2011

“These free, informally structured programs foster a sense of community with photographers, PRC members, and students by offering an opportunity to share images and insights about particular topics in contemporary photographic practice. Presenters bring prints or show images on their own laptops, and are asked to make a brief statement about their work.” – PRC website

image of artist Keith Prue

 

Vintage and Modern: Workshop on Collecting Photography with Alice Zimet – October 13, 2011

“Alice Zimet conducted this fun, social, and informative workshop focusing on collecting photography, with a particular spotlight on the PRC 2011 Benefit Auction pieces. Karen Haas, the Lane Collection Curator of Photographs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, led a tour of highlights from the live auction.

Attendees gained a greater understanding of the photography marketplace and the proper tools to become thoughtful photography collectors.” – PRC

Alice Zimet

 

Catherine Wagner: Photographs and Public Projects – October 19, 2011

“Catherine Wagner presented the last thirty years of her work, concentrating on projects of the last decade.” – PRC

Catherine Wagner and Attendees

Photograping at The Photographic Resource Center

900 Feet

New York City is a place that I pass through frequently, but barely get to spend any quality time in. This was true once again last week when I traveled home for a friend’s wedding. Only an hour and a half Wednesday, and the same on Sunday. What can you see in the city in that amount of time? Not much. It’s hard to escape the crush of Times Square and the accompanying tourists when travel takes you to both the Port Authority and Penn Station. The city becomes neon and paper, with billboards and brick clouding the sky. But if you look closely, there are still striking views to be seen. All the following photos were taken within one block (which, according to the all-knowing Wikipedia, is typically 900 feet long in Manhattan).

 

buildings

 

side of a building

 

building facade

 

photo of NYC

 

photo of NYC

 

photo of NYC

 

And because it is New York . . .

a bicycle in New York

900 Feet

The City

This past weekend I took one of those seemingly endless bus rides down to a city that has grown on me in the last year. I remember being afraid of  New York City up through high school. It’s a world apart from my hometown, and seemed too full, too busy. My biggest complaint was that the sun, blocked by skyscrapers, didn’t reach the ground.

But what a difference a few years makes. Boston is, as my boyfriend says, a great starter city and my love for Boston has greatly augmented my enjoyment of New York. My last two trips there were quick but intensely enjoyable. Spontaneous adventures, birthday cake in a park in the middle of winter, long long walks, museums with walls for miles . . .

Sadly, this time around was not the same. Time and the subway system seemed to conspire against my fellow travelers and me. We rushed around and my camera barely saw the light of day. The few shots that I grabbed are below. But soon, very soon, I hope to go back, with my camera leading the way.

 

neon landscape

 

Portrait in Times Square

 

portrait

 

urban landscape

Subway Signs

The City