News and New Photos

Hello all from the very snowy Northeast! I figured I’d take advantage of being snowed in to share some really exciting news and a few new photos.

First things first – I am thrilled to report that my work is currently being shown in Cambridge, England! United Photo Industries joined with the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Cambridge to create Human Flows, a group exhibition of photography on the topic of humanity and movement. I’m on the lookout for photos of the installation and show opening, but in the meantime, you can read more about the exhibition here.

Over the last two months I also took advantage of the break between my classes to do a bit of shooting towards a new project. I’m keeping most of the work private until the project is complete, but I wanted to share two of the new images with you. I also rediscovered an old image from 2008, and you can see all three below. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the work in the comments!

 

Untitled 32, 2013:

Untitled 32

 

Untitled 35, 2013:

Untitled 35

 

Untitled 8, 2008:

Untitled 8

 

I hope to have more news and photos for you all shortly!

News and New Photos

Lost and Found

It’s interesting how time changes one’s perspective. The following two images were hidden in plain sight among a more complete series of work (will be posted sooner or later). I remember not thinking much of these photos when I took them. But now, four or five years later, I find myself taken with them. Texture, color, a sense of the surface of the film. Simple pleasures, simple photos.

leaves

leaves

Lost and Found

Inspired by Art History

Even before I started college I was fascinated by religious iconography: tragic, torturous stories illustrated with some of the most beautiful figures in the history of art. The sensual nature of the works creates a strange but enthralling dichotomy. They are spiritual, devotional . . . yet carnal. I developed a deep love of the sculptor Bernini (Baroque period) as well as etchings and prints from the Medieval period. These works ended up informing most of the artwork I created while in college.

The following photos are two of my all-time favorites, featuring my two favorite models. They are from a 12-image series, entitled “Mastering Translation,” originally presented in the same diptych format in a single line on a wall.

diptych of two nudesMore images from this project and similar series will be featured in the future.

Inspired by Art History

(Old) Favorites

My second to last semester of college was one of my least creative while at school. I was taking a high-level photography class, but produced little work. The lull may have been due to my focus on my sculpture class, which was enjoyable, but also yielded little in the way of satisfying artwork.

So I began to play. One of my classmates at Hampshire was great to brainstorm with, and by January 2008 I was in the studio experimenting. Everything about the shoot was simple: one model, one or two lights, and a black backdrop. The first set I took was . . . ok. I still hadn’t figured out exactly what I was doing or why, and it was obvious when looking at the negatives. But the second set, ohh the second set. The model was one of my close friends, a fantastically creative individual who provided continual inspiration. She had never modeled before but I convinced her that the setup was simple enough that she just needed to be comfortable unclothed. So she braved a cool studio and my camera, and helped me create stunningly beautiful negatives. The two following images are from that shoot:

photograph

 

photograph

Each image is not a single photograph, but instead a cropped section of a long negative. I only partially advanced the film after each shot which resulted in extra long negatives and unexpected successes. These two images have been long-time favorites of mine (can three years be classified as “long”?) and began my favorite series of work that I’ve created so far.

(Old) Favorites